Programs Past

3 May 2014
Good Day Sun King: Baroque Music from New Orleans and New France

Baroque music in New Orleans? Founded in 1718 by the French, it was not long before the Lower Mississippi Valley was populated with French people and French culture. And up river in Montreal and Québec, Parisian music publishers provided the northernmost part of New France with music of all types from "back home." Kim Pineda, transverse flute, Elinor Frey, Baroque cello, Hideki Yamaya, Baroque guitar and theorbo, August Denhard, theorbo and Baroque guitar, and special guest Janene Nelsoon perform vocal and instrumental music from New Orleans's Ursuline Manuscript of 1736, plus music by Monteclair, Couperin, Marais, and other composers from the reign of Louis XIV.

8 February 2014
Galant and Grounded: Paying for Time Travel with the Currency of Music
In this concert we travel between the Galant style of the 18th century and the rhapsodic, capricious styles of the 17th century. Kim Pineda, transverse flute, Elinor Frey, Baroque cello, August Denhard, theorbo and Baroque guitar. Music by Fontana, Fiorè, Gabrielli, Kapsberger, Kirnberger, Blavet, and CPE Bach.

4 May 2013
La rhétorique de la musique: Behind the scenes of the grand siècle
Kim Pineda, Joanna Blendulf, August Denhard, and Hideki Yamaya present La musique classique, ou l'époque baroque. Music of 17th- and 18th-century France; what more do you need?

12 January 2013
Breaking Baroque: Diminutions, Divisions, & the end of the Renaissance

Kim Pineda and August Denhard present repertoire from the late 16th and early seventeenth centuries, that nebulous time period where the Renaissance ends and the Baroque begins.

4 May 2012
Battle of the Bands: Le Roi Soleil and Sanssouci take on the Dresden Hofkappelle

At the courts of Louis XIV, Frederick II (The Great), and Frederick Augustus I (The Strong), the cities of Paris, Berlin/Potsdam, and Dresden were regarded as among the finest musical establishments in Europe during the years 1660-1760.

François Couperin, Jacques-Martin Hotteterre (Paris), Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (Berlin), Wilhelm Friedemann Bach (Dresden), and Johann-Joachim Quantz (Dresden, Berlin, Potsdam) and others provide the musical material for us. Enjoy the concert and cast your vote for in the Baroque Battle of the Bands!


Kim Pineda, Baroque flute, Max Fuller, Viola da gamba, August Denhard, Theorbo and Baroque guitar, and Julia Brown, Harpsichord.

24 March 2012
Un Mélange Baroque: A Musical Tour of Francophonia
Special guests, Joanna Blendulf, pardessus de viole and viola da gamba, and Hideki Yamaya, lutes, join Kim Pineda, Baroque flute, Max Fuller, Viola da gamba, August Denhard, Theorbo and Baroque guitar. You've heard us play French music before. What we didn't tell you was that much of this music is infused with Spanish, Italian, and Germanic elements, brought to France by itinerant musicians. In spite of his best efforts, Jean Baptiste Lully (an Italian by birth and blood) was unable to keep the outsiders away from his dream of a purely French musical style. Join us and our special guests for this investigative tour of French music.

Program:
Jacques-Martin Hotteterre (1674-1763)
Trio Sonata in A, Op 3, No V

François Couperin (1668-1733)
Quatriéme Concert, from Concerts Royaux, 1722

François Campion (c. 1685-1748)
Prelude, Allemande "La furieuse," Air

Matthias Maute (b. 1962)
Rouge (2004)
[Commissioned by Baroque Northwest in 2004]

Improvisation on La Bergamasca

Marin Marais (1656-1728)
Suite in D, from Pièces de violes, IIIe Livre (1711)

Michel Blavet (1700-1768)
Sonata Quarta, Op. 3

François Couperin
Le Parnasse, ou L'Apotheose de Corelli, 1724

21 January 2012
Journey to the Center of the Baroque: Music from the European Heartland
Music by Muffat, Schmelzer, Jarzewbski, and other 17th-century composers from Central and Eastern Europe. 


What composers come to mind when you mention Salzburg and Vienna? If we add Warsaw to the list of cities, are you still thinking of Mozart? Georg Muffat, Johann Heinrich Schmelzer, and Adam Jarzebski were three composers from Central and Northern Europe that were both cosmopolitan and progressive, based on their personal musical experiences. Kim Pineda, Recorder and Baroque flute, Max Fuller, Viola da gamba, August Denhard Lutes, will be your guides on your journey to the center of the Baroque where you will hear elements of vernacular (dare we say "folk") music incorporated into the innovative German sonata, and music infused with traces Lully and Corelli.

24 September 2011
The Baroque Battle of the Bands!

Atrium Building Courtyard
10th Avenue & Olive Street
Eugene, Oregon

Kim Pineda, Baroque Flute
Bernard Gordillo, Harpsichord

Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (1714-1788)
Sonata in G, H. 554
Adagio
Allegro
Vivace

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
Aria [and improvisation], BWV 988

Tim Risher (b. 1957)
River (2009)

Johann Mattheson (1681-1764)
Sonata III in A, from Brauchbare Virtuoso, 1720
Adagio
Allegro
Grave
Giga

Antonio Martin y Coll (fl. 1706-09)
Chacona [and improvisation] from Flores de Música

Michel Blavet (1700-1768)
Sonata VI, Op. 3
Largo
Allegro
Andante affetuoso
Allegro

The cities of Paris, Berlin/Potsdam, and Hamburg were regarded as among the finest musical establishments in Europe in the 18th century. Michel Blavet (Paris), CPE Bach (Berlin/Potsdam and Hamburg), and Johann Mattheson (Hamburg) provide the musical material for us. Enjoy the concert and cast your vote in the Baroque Battle of the Bands!

The program will also include a work written for Mr. Pineda, "River," by American composer Tim Risher, and harpsichord solos with improvisations by J. S. Bach (who spent some time in Berlin/Potsdam) and Antonio Martin y Coll.

13 August 2011
Les goûts-réunis: Music from Paris, Berlin, and Dresden
Charlotte Convention Center, 501 S. College St., Room 213 A,
Charlotte, NC
10:00 AM (early, I know)
Part of the National Flute Association's Annual Convention

Kim Pineda, Baroque flute
Bernard Gordillo, Harpsichord

Frederick the Great (1712-1786)
Sonata V in A
Affettuoso
Allegro
Presto

Louis Couperin (1626-1661)
Chaconne in Bb

Johann-Joachim Quantz (1697-1773)
Sonata IV in D, Op. 1
Grave e sostenuto
Presto
Allegro

Tim Risher (b. 1957)
River (2009)

Antonio Martin y Coll (fl. 1706-09)
Chacona [and improvisation] from Flores de Música

Michel Blavet (1700-1768)
Sonata VI, Op. 3
Largo
Allegro
Andante affetuoso
Allegro

Les goûts-réunis: Music from Paris, Berlin, and Dresden, is a program of sonatas for Baroque flute and harpsichord written by composers connected with the courts in Paris, Berlin, and Dresden. Michel Blavet (Paris), Frederick the Great, (Berlin), and Johann Joachim Quantz (Paris, Berlin, and Dresden) were all significant in the development of the flute repertoire and its rise to prominence as a solo instrument. The cosmopolitan nature of the music by these composers is the unity between the three major music centers in the 18th century. Blavet was known throughout Europe, Frederick had arguably the best musical establishment in Germany and flutes were featured prominently, and Quantz is well-known for his treatise on performance practice and musical travels. The program will also include the world premier of a work written for Mr. Pineda, River, by American composer Tim Risher. Harpsichord solos by Louis Couperin and Antonio Martin y Coll complete the program.

Frederick’s Sonata in A-major is written in the popular format of the mid-to-late 18th century. A slow movement followed by two fast movements of contrasting character. Definitely not the caliber of Bach, the
music still has much to offer and is clearly the work of a well-trained professional musician, with a good harmonic vocabulary, and, ironically, interesting rhythms.

Louis Couperin was a composer, harpsichordist, organist, and viol player, and the most famous member of the Couperin family after his nephew François. Most of his surviving compositions—around 200 pieces—are for the harpsichord and organ, none of which were published during his lifetime. Couperin is considered one of the finest composers of keyboard music from the 17th Century. The Chaconne in Bb is characteristic of his passacaglias and chaconnes (pieces written over a repeating bass line), which are often highly sophisticated, yet quirky and unpredictable, consistently written with a tinge of melancholy.

Quantz’s Sonata in D from Opus 1 is typical of the solo sonata in the late baroque period. The new standard of movements was that of a slow movement followed by two fast movements of contrasting character. According to Quantz, the first movement, Grave e sostenuto, was the absolute slowest tempo of the day, and allows performers great freedom to be expressive. Compare that with the second movement, a Presto in ¾ meter, which Quantz listed as the absolute fastest tempo of the day. The character of this movement is emotionally very different from the first. The last movement is a relaxing, carefree melodic jaunt. Quantz points out that the tempos at the court of Frederick the Great were generally faster than those with the same indications in the rest of Europe, but the tempos in Dresden were faster still.


In 1726 Michel Blavet made his début at the Concert Spirituel, launching a remarkable public career. During the next quarter of a century Blavet appeared at the Concert Spirituel more frequently than any other performer, and throughout the period musicians and writers were unanimous in stating that his singing tone, pure intonation and brilliant technique set the standard in flute playing for all of Europe. Blavet's position in Parisian musical life was unrivaled. Among those who wrote with admiration of him were Telemann, Marpurg, Quantz, and Voltaire. It is likely that many of Leclair's nine flute sonatas and his flute concerto were written for Blavet, for the two often performed together. Blavet's sonatas, among the masterpieces of the early flute repertory, represent the successful transfer to the flute of the goûts réunis of French violin sonata style, developed by Senaillé and Leclair, among others. The sonatas of op. 3 exhibit a modern, galant style, with Italian titles to the movements, and elaborate flourishes in the slow movements.

25 September 2010
The French Concoction: Parisian music with Italian Flavor

Kim Pineda, Bernard Gordillo, and August Denhard present a musical feast of music from 17th- and 18th-century France.

26 March 2009
Lubbock, Texas
Grand Cru Baroque will be performing on Thursday, 26 March 26 2009, 8:00 PM, at the YWCA's Legacy Grand Ballroom, 14th & Ave. O in Lubbock, Texas. The concert is in conjunction with workshops and master classes the ensemble is giving at Texas Tech University.

2 September 2008

Early Music Guild of Seattle, First Tuesdays

Kim Pineda, Transverse flute, and Bernard Gordillo, Harpsichord

Michel Blavet (1700-1768)
Sonata in A, Op. 3, No. 4
Adagio
Allegro, Ma Non Presto
Allegro

Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Fantasies 8 and 9, from 12 Fantasies for solo flute, 1732

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
Concerto in C, BWV 976 (after Vivaldi op. 3 no. 12)
[ ]
Largo
Allegro

Intermission

Jean-Marie Leclair (1697 - 1764)
Sonata II, Quatrième Livre
Dolce: Andante
Allemanda: Allegro ma non tropo
Sarabanda: Adagio
Minuetto: Allegro non tropo

Anonymous
Chacona, from Flores de musica, 1706-1709

Johann Gottlieb Goldberg (1727 - 1756)
Trio Sonata in C major
(Formerly attributed to J.S. Bach as BWV 1037)
Adagio
Alla breve
Largo
Gigue. Presto

Program Notes
Grand Cru is a classification of an entity's potential to produce something superb. It also refers to any item of high quality, or the quality of a region. Our progressive program of pieces by J.S. Bach, Jean-Marie Leclair, Michel Blavet, Georg Philipp Telemann, and the ubiquitous Anonymous all meet the grand cru standard.

In 1726 Michel Blavet made his début at the Concert Spirituel, launching a remarkable public career. During the next quarter of a century Blavet appeared at the Concert Spirituel more frequently than any other performer, and throughout the period musicians and writers were unanimous in stating that his singing tone, pure intonation and brilliant technique set the standard in flute playing for all of Europe. Blavet's position in Parisian musical life was unrivaled. Among those who wrote with admiration of him were Telemann, Marpurg, Quantz, and Voltaire. It is likely that many of Leclair's nine flute sonatas and his flute concerto were written for Blavet, for the two often performed together.

Blavet's sonatas, among the masterpieces of the early flute repertory, represent the successful transfer to the flute of the goûts réunis of French violin sonata style, developed by Senaillé and Leclair, among others. The sonatas of op. 3 exhibit a modern, galant style, in contrast to those of op.2, which reflect the French influence on the Corellian sonata da chiesa model.

When Georg Philipp Telemann published his 12 Fantasies for transverse flute in 1732, he had no idea that Johann-Joachim Quantz would suggest they be used in a flute-playing contest. After Quantz, the well-known pedagogue, composer, and writer about music, had his flute playing techniques publicly challenged by a rival, he suggested that they meet in public at a prescribed time and place, and each be prepared to perform Telemann's Fantasies. They were the perfect vehicle to show what is possible on the transverse flute and for the flute player to display his mastery of the instrument. The day came and went and only Quantz appeared and had the audience to himself. Whatever the 18th century flute player and audience thought, the Fantasies are now seen as a significant contribution to the unaccompanied repertoire of the flute. They are a concise presentation of 18th century music. Telemann presents most dance types in use at the time, as well as rhapsodic movements reminiscent of a keyboard toccata, and by using compound melodies, produce fugue-like pieces where it seems that as many as three individual voices are playing simultaneously.

Jean-Marie Leclair published a second book of violin sonatas in 1728 and made his début with 12 appearances at the Concert Spirituel, where he was vigorously applauded in performances of his own sonatas and concertos. Leclair's achievement as a composer lay in his modification of the Corellian sonata style to accommodate French taste. The result was the goûts réunis prophesied by Couperin, and later recommended by Quantz. He imbued the Italian sonata style with elements drawn from the earlier dances of Jean-Baptiste Lully and from the pièces of the French viol players and harpsichordists. Leclair was often able to combine the two styles and to arrive at a new synthesis.

--kp

Goldberg, J.S. Bach, and Anonymous…

What happens to a work no longer accepted to be by a master? The issue comes up in the art world somewhat often, even making headlines, yet rarely does music ever attract similar attention. Most often, the downgrading happens at an "official" level where a musical work's attribution is removed in a relatively quiet manner (sometimes it coincides with the discovery of the work's original creator). A presumed masterpiece then loses its stature, value, and, most troubling of all, any hope of frequent performance.

Johann Gottlieb Goldberg's Trio Sonata in C major for two violins and basso continuo (formerly known as BWV 1037) is a good example of a work once thought to be by his former teacher Johann Sebastian Bach. Goldberg wrote in a style not unlike his mentor's, hence the confusion, yet today he isn't highly regarded as a composer (he's remembered primarily for the monumental set of variations that Bach composed to which his name is attached). In spite of this, the Trio Sonata in C major has survived its downgrading because of its beauty. The version heard this evening is an arrangement for flute and obbligato harpsichord where the two violin lines are taken by the flute and harpsichordist's right hand, a practice typical of the late Baroque.

What happens when a masterpiece is suped-up by another master? It was not uncommon for Baroque composers to take musical ideas, change, and incorporate them as their own. Sometimes they took them as is and claimed authorship with no change at all. Rarely, if ever, was it considered stealing. More often it was a kind of homage.

The discovery by J. S. Bach of Vivaldi's music is considered important by many scholars. Vivaldi's concertos were not only tuneful, they were attractive and well made. Bach was impressed enough to make some of them his own by arranging them for solo keyboard. The Concerto in C major, BWV 976, was once a piece of chamber music for strings; part of Vivaldi's collection of concertos entitled L'Estro armonico, and, arguably, the late-Baroque's most widely disseminated work. Bach not only reduced its many original parts but also made it suitable for keyboard.

The story of the little Chacona and its variations has neither an illustrious history nor a composer to call its own. In fact, we only know of the copyist, Antonio Martín y Coll, who felt the work attractive enough to include in his large collection of organ pieces called Flores de Musica (compiled 1706-1709). The chacona, like its cousin the sarabande, was a dance that originated in the New World and came to Europe via Spain and Italy.

--bg



Scroll down to see our programs from 1997-2013

Season XVI: 2012-13
22 September 2012
Baroque And Far From Home:
Colonial Music of France and Spain
Performed By:
Kim Pineda, Max Fuller, August Denhard, Hideki Yamaya
Join us as we explore the colonial music of France (Québec, New Orleans) and Spain (the Americas and Caribbean). You'll hear familiar music by familiar composers, as well as some new world music by New World people.

12 January 2013
Breaking Baroque: Diminutions, Divisions, & the end of the Renaissance
Performed By: Kim Pineda and August Denhard
In this duo recital, Kim and Gus present repertoire from the late 16th and early seventeenth centuries, that nebulous time period where the Renaissance ends and the Baroque begins.

13 April 2013
The return of smoke & blisters: virtuosic chamber music with a dash of pyrotechnics
Performed by: Kim Pineda, Max Fuller, August Denhard, Hideki Yamaya.
Hang on to your hats, and maybe bring a fire extinguisher, as the band plays some amazing, chimerical, and invigorating music from 18th-century hot spots.

27 April 2013
Early Music on the Silk Road: The Musical Connections Between the Middle and Far East and Europe
Performed by: Tomoko Sugawara, Asian kugo harp & gothic harp and August Denhard, lute. Special guest: Jane Hall, percussion. 
The duo of harp and lute is recorded in ancient Eastern and Western iconography and had a place in art music, religious ritual, and informal settings. Sugawara and Denhard trace the birth of plucked instrumental music from pre-Ottoman times through the Western medieval period with imaginative arrangements and improvisations for kugo harp, ud, and plectrum lute.

4 May 2013
La rhétorique de la musique: Behind the scenes of the grand siècle
Performed by: Kim Pineda, Joanna Blendulf, August Denhard, Hideki Yamaya
La musique classique, ou l'époque baroque. Music of 17th- and 18th-century France; what more do you need?

Season XV: 2011-2012
September 17, 2011
feast of hamburgers:
music from 18th-century hamburg
Hamburg was a city with a formidable musical presence. Hear why in this program of music by Telemann, CPE Bach, Handel, Mattheson, and Scheibe.

German Baroque is more than J S Bach in Leipzig, the formidable Hofkapelle in Dresden,
or the musical establishments of Frederick the Great in Berlin and Potsdam. Since the seventeenth century the city of Hamburg has held an important place in music and international trade, and in the eighteenth century it became a major music center. This was no doubt the result of composers such as Telemann, Mattheson, and later CPE Bach living there. Even George Frideric Handel worked in Hamburg early in his career, where he gained valuable experience that he would later use as an opera composer.

Join Kim Pineda, Baroque flute, Max Fuller, Viola da gamba, August Denhard, Theorbo and Baroque guitar, and Bernard Gordillo, Harpsichord, as they explore the vast repast of chamber music by these Hamburger composers.

January 21, 2012 (church sanctuary)
journey to the center of the baroque:
music from the european heartland
Music by Muffat, Schmelzer, Jarzewbski, and other 17th-century
composers from Central and Eastern Europe.

What composers come to mind when you mention Salzburg and Vienna? If we add Warsaw to the list of cities, are you still thinking of Mozart? Georg Muffat, Johann Heinrich Schmelzer, and Adam Jarzebski were three composers from Central and Northern Europe that were both cosmopolitan and progressive, based on their personal musical experiences. Kim Pineda, Recorder and Baroque flute, Max Fuller, Viola da gamba, August Denhard Lutes, will be your guides on your journey to the center of the Baroque where you will hear elements of vernacular (dare we say "folk") music incorporated into the innovative German sonata, and music infused with traces Lully and Corelli.

March 24, 2012
un mélange baroque:
a musical tour of francophonia
Special guests, Joanna Blendulf, pardessus de viole and viola da gamba, and Hideki Yamaya, lutes, join Kim Pineda, Baroque flute, Max Fuller, Viola da gamba, August Denhard, Theorbo and Baroque guitar.

You've heard us play French music before. What we didn't tell you was that much of this music is infused with Spanish, Italian, and Germanic elements, brought to France by itinerant musicians. In spite of his best efforts, Jean Baptiste Lully (an Italian by birth and blood) was unable to keep the outsiders away from his dream of a purely French musical style. Join us and our special guests for this investigative tour of French music.

May 4, 2012 (friday)
battle of the bands:
le roi soleil and sanssouci take on the dresden hofkappelle
At the courts of Louis XIV, Frederick II (The Great), and Frederick Augustus I (The Strong), the cities of Paris, Berlin/Potsdam, and Dresden were regarded as among the finest musical establishments in Europe during the years 1660-1760.

François Couperin, Jacques-Martin Hotteterre (Paris), Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (Berlin), Wilhelm Friedemann Bach (Dresden), and Johann-Joachim Quantz (Dresden, Berlin, Potsdam) and others provide the musical material for us. Enjoy the concert and cast your vote for in the Baroque Battle of the Bands!

Kim Pineda, Baroque flute, Max Fuller, Viola da gamba, August Denhard, Theorbo and Baroque guitar, and Julia Brown, Harpsichord.

Season XIV: 2010-11
Concert I, September 25, 2010
The French Concoction: Parisian music with Italian Flavor
Kim Pineda, Bernard Gordillo, and August Denhard present a musical feast of music from 17th- and 18th-century France.

Concert II, February 19, 2011
From Prussia with Love II: Music from the courts of Berlin and Dresden
The Treaty of Dresden ended the war between Prussia, Saxony, and Austria. Kim Pineda, Bernard Gordillo, August Denhard, and Max Fuller share the benefits of this treaty with music from the two greatest musical establishments in 18th-century Germany.

Special Event
February 24, 25, 26, 2011:
Henry Purcell's Indian Queen

Kim Pineda is the music director for this collaborative program with Seattle Early Dance and the Early Music Guild of Seattle.

Season XIII: 2009-2010

All concerts on Saturday night at 7:30 PM

Concert One, September 19, 2009
Baroque à la mode
Couperin, Leclair, Marais, and Boismortier were all successful French composers who wrote beautiful chamber music for a variety of tastes. Their works are among the most cherished by today's performers and audiences alike. Harpsichordist Bernard Gordillo returns to Seattle to join the Baroque Northwest quartet.

Concert Two, December 19, 2009
The Spice of Life: Variations on Musical Themes
Vocal and instrumental music were closely tied together in the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods each genre inspiring the other. While instrumentalists were on a quest to imitate the human voice, vocalists were inspired to new heights by their brilliant instrumental colleagues. Exhausting the potential of a musical theme through variation is a crowning achievement by musicians of all periods. Join the Baroque Northwest Quartet for instrumental variations of vocal music, dance music, and everything in between.Variety is the spice of life!

Concert Three, February 6, 2010
The Scottish Harp, with Maxine Eilander
Early harp virtuoso Maxine Eilander joins Elizabeth C.D. Brown, Gus Denhard, and Ronnee Fullerton for music of Scotland, with a nod to Wales, Ireland, and Britain. The harp passed freely between the worlds of traditional and art music during the Renaissance and Baroque as it does today, and the British Isles produced some of the worlds finest harpers and performance styles. Baroque Northwest puts it all together with Maxine, one of Seattles musical treasurers.

Concert Four, March 20, 2010
Back to Basics: Baroque Northwest does the Standards
Revisit the Baroque standards as envisioned by the creative minds and instrumental palette of the Baroque Northwest Quartet. Like a jazz combo playing the standards from the golden age of jazz, Baroque Northwest returns to its roots and pays homage to the most renowned composers of the high Baroque. Vivaldi, Bach, Handel, Telemann; its all good!

Season XII: 2008-09
For the 2008-2009 concert season, Baroque Northwest takes you on a tour of Europe in our new venue, Trinity Parish Church. Start in France, then to Spain and around the Mediterranean to Turkey, Germany by way of Italy, and with two stops in England. You’ll hear music by composers you have never experienced, and you’ll get better acquainted with some composers you have already met.
Concert descriptions on the blog

Concert I--Friday, 19 September 2008, 7:30 PM. Pre-concert event at 7:00 PM
Louis Louis: Music from the Courts of Louis XIV and Louis XV

Concert II--Friday, 21 November 2008, 7:30 PM. Pre-concert event at 7:00 PM.
Mediterraneo II: More Music from Byzantium to Iberia

Special Guests Kane Mathis and Ruthie Dornfeld join the Baroque Northwest Trio (Ronnee Fullerton, Elizabeth Brown, Gus Denhard) to play Traditional, Renaissance, and Baroque music from Turkey, Iberia, North Africa, and other countries.

Concert III--20 March 2009, 7:30 PM. Pre-concert event at 7:00 PM.
Bach to the Futue: The Baroque Avant-Garde

Join The Baroque Northwest Trio (Kim Pineda, Ronnee Fullerton, and Gus Denhard) as we explore the outer limits of baroque music, with special guest Bernard Gordillo, harpsichord. Music by Johann Philipp Kirnberger, CPE Bach, Johann Hieronymus Kapsberger, and Johann Sebastian Bach.


Season XI: 2007-2008

Concert One, October 6, 2007
From Prussia with Love: Music from the Court of Frederick the Great
Join us as we perform music by composers employed or enjoyed by the King (Frederick, not Elvis). Music by CPE Bach, J. P. Kirnberger, Jan Dismas Zelenka, and others. The Baroque Northwest quartet is joined by violinist Tekla Cunningham and harpsichordist Jennifer Streeter.

Concert Two, December 21, 2007 (Friday night)
A Tale of Two Cultures: Music for Heaven and Earth
Baroque Northwest celebrates the celestial (Christmas music from Germany) and terrestrial (secular music from Italy). The Baroque Northwest Quartet is joined by special guest Annalisa Pappano on lirone and viola da gamba, Courtney Kuroda, violin, and soprano Karen Elizabeth Urlie.

Concert Three, February 23, 2008
Closing the Gap: The Quest for Unification Continues
Join the Baroque Northwest Quartet as we combine forces with special guest fiddler and Seattle favorite Ruthie Dornfeld in a program of music from Iberia, Mexico, and other parts of the New World. Discover the traditional roots of baroque music and enjoy the early music roots of traditional music.

Concert Four, April 5, 2008
Dijon on the Loire: Music of the Mellon and Dijon Chansonniers
Baroque Northwest steps back in time to the late 15th century, performing Franco-Flemish chansons found in the Mellon and Dijon chansonniers (vocal and instrumental versions of both). This repertoire was intensely cultivated throughout France, Italy, and the Low Countries. Baroque Northwest is joined by Renaissance winds virtuoso and vocalist Debra Nagy.

Season X: 2006-2007

October 7, 2006
Reformation or Revolution:Music from 17th Century England
And some late 16th century music as well. . .
With special guest Eric Mentzel

December 9, 2006
Mediterraneo: From Byzantium to Iberia
Join us for a musical sailing around the Mediterranean.
Special Guest: Karen Elizabeth Urlie, soprano

January 20, 2007
Closing the Gap: Baroque Appalachia
Discover the early music roots of Appalachian music with Seattle favorites Ruthie Dornfeld and Mark Roberts.

April 14, 2007
Flutes in Flight II: Another wild woodwind adventure with Jed Wentz & Janet See

Season IX: 2005-06

October 1, 2005
Travels with Quantz

November 12, 2005
Duo Recital:
Kim Pineda, transverse flute, Jillon Stoppels Dupree, harpsichord

December 3, 2005
The Great Unknowns:
Great music by unknown composers . . .

February 17 & 18, 2006
Revolutionary Baroque:
Music of Thomas Jefferson's Library
with Shira Kammen & Charles Coldwell.

April 7 & 8, 2006
Closing the Gap: Music from the Louisiana Territory
with Seattle Cajun band Capuchon.

Season VIII: 2004-05

Seattle Series
October 16, 2004
Baroque without Borders:
A Musical Tour of Europe

December 11, 2004
From Iberia to the New World:
An Exchange of Treasures

January 28 & 29, 2005
Flutes in Flight:
A musical high wire act without a net!
with Jed Wentz & Matthias Maute.

February 18, 2005
Vivacious Viols: Consort Music in Three Parts with Margriet Tindemans, Annalisa Pappano, & Ronnee Fullerton

April 8 & 9, 2005
Closing the Gap:
Music from the British Isles with Chris Smith, Angela Mariani, & Joel Bernstein

Special Events
January 8, 2005, 8:00 PM
Duo Recital:
Elizabeth Brown and August Denhard
Lutes & Guitars
Bethany Lutheran Church, Seattle

Orcas Theater and Community Center
Orcas Island, Washington
March 12, 2005, 7:30 PM
$19 non-members, $16 members, $10 student
917 Mount Baker Road
Eastsound, WA 98245

Lower Valley Community Concert Series
Sunnyside, Washington
April 16, 2005, 7:30 PM
Sunnyside High School auditorium, 16th and Edison.

Season VII: 2003-2004

Since 1993, the Benevolent Order for Music of the Baroque has aspired to both expand the horizons of classical music listeners and to invite listeners of non-classical music to find out more about the early music world, and have fun while doing so. This year we include a mini-series of cross-genre concerts called Closing the Gap. In these cross-genre concerts we will demonstrate the ways that early music relates to particular folk traditions from Europe to the New World. All pre-concert events take place 1 hour before the concert in the concert space.

Early Music Series
October 18 & 19, 2003
Culture Clash:
Music from Italy and France

December 13 & 14, 2003
Winter Solstice and Holiday Concert

April 16-17, 2004
Bläsing Baroque:
Virtuosic Music for Two Flutes

Mini-Series: Closing the Gap
January 30-31, 2004
Across the Carpathians:
Music from Central & Eastern Europe
with Ensemble Sub Masa

February 21-22, 2004
Music of the New World:
Who Discovered Whom?
with Correo Aereo

Season VI: 2002-03
benevolent order for music of the baroque

October 12 & 13, 2002
The Rhetoric of Gods and Monsters
Music with a rhetorical twist, including Tartini's "Devil's Trill" sonata, and François Couperin's Apotheosis of Corelli.

December 14 & 15, 2002
Winter Solstice and Holiday Concert
Charpentier's sublime Nativity Pastorale, plus music for the season.
February 22 & 23, 2003
Les Caractères de la danse
Jean-Féry Rebel's compendium of baroque dance, and two cantatas by Louis-Nicolas Clerambault. This program features baroque dancer Anna Mansbridge and New York-based soprano Kristin Gould.

April 5 & 6, 2003
Solo Recital: Baroque Northwest presents Kim Pineda, transverse flute and recorder, assisted by William Skeen, cello and viola da gamba, and Jack Ashworth, harpsichord.

Season V: 2001-02
benevolent order for music of the baroque

October 20 & 21, 2001
The Gauntlet: The Ultimate Chamber Music Challenge Join our squad as they tackle some of the most demanding chamber music from the 17th and 18th centuries, culminating in Johann Sebastian Bach's exciting, dazzling, and mind-bending Brandenburg Concerto 5.

December 15 & 16, 2001
Benevolent Order for Music of the Baroque's Holiday Blast Celebrate the season with our eclectic blend of Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque music for voices and instruments. Linda Strandberg joins the holiday band for a fun holiday event.

February 23 & 24, 2002
The Son of Smoke & Blisters: Our Annual Concerto Extravaganza. This year we pit the "younger" generation of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach and Giussepe Tartini against the "old guard" of J S Bach, Vivaldi, and the ubiquitous Telemann. Not to be missed, this concert features the Pacific Northwest Premier on period instruments of Tartini's action-packed Viola da gamba concerto, as well as CPE Bach's Concerto in a, for Flute & strings, JS Bach's Violin Concerto in E, Vivaldi's Concerto in g for 2 cellos plus a couple of surprises.

May 11 & 12, 2002 Extra-Strength, Double-Barreled, High-Octane Formula Our season finale presents a wide variety of instense chamber music for smaller forces from the 16th-, 17th-, and 18th centuries. Watch as everyone plays at least two different instruments!

Season IV:  2000-2001
benevolent order for music of the baroque
Saturdays at 8PM, Sundays at 3PM
$20 General Admission, $15 Students, Seniors, Members of EMA

10/21 & 22/2000
BACH-analia: Music of JS Bach, his sons, & contemporaries
Performed at Bethany Lutheran Church 7400 Woodlawn NE (Greenlake)
This concert is part of Seattle's Bach Festival!

12/2 & 3/2000 The Holiday Blast: Medieval, Renaissance, & Baroque Music for the Holidays
Performed at Bethany Lutheran Church 7400 Woodlawn NE (Greenlake)

2/24 & 25/2001
Bride of Smoke and Blisters: Virtuosic Concertos for Winds & Strings
Performed at The Church at 6556 35th Avenue NE (Wedgwood)

5/5 & 6/2001
Innocence Lost: Marc-Antoine Charpentier's opera Acteon
Plus: Action-packed instrumental music by Charpentier and Jean-Marie Leclair!
Performed at Bethany Lutheran Church 7400 Woodlawn NE (Greenlake)
Season III: 1999-2000

16 & 17 October 1999
Apocalypse Now: Music from the end of an Era

11 & 12 December 1999
Christmas in France: Charpentier's Midnight Mass & Nativity Pastorale

26 & 27 February 2000
Smoke & Blisters II: Virtuosic Concertos for Winds & Strings

12 & 13 May 2000 (note this is Friday & Saturday nights)
Heinrich Schuetz: The Passion According to St. Matthew
Our concerts are performed at:
The Church at 6556 35th Avenue NE, Seattle
Fridays & Saturdays at 8PM, Sundays at 3PM.

Season II: 1998-99
benevolent order for music of the baroque

31 October & 1 November 1998
the baroque avant-garde
@ UW's Brechemin Auditorium (Sat., with COSTUME CONTEST!) & Henry Art Gallery (Sun.)

27 & 28 February 1999
concertos, cantatas, & cacophony:
the early days of rock 'n' roll
@ Music Center of the Northwest, 96th & Linden, Seattle

10 & 11 April 1999
the magnificent seven:
the liberal arts in sight & sound
@ Nippon Kan Theater, 628 S. Washington St., in Seattle's International District.

Season I: Our 1997-98 Season! Our first in Seattle and fifth overall
benevolent order for music of the baroque
Our Debut Review!

9/27 & 28/97--Bubba Baroque: Music from Southern Europe
2/28 & 3/1/98--Smoke & Blisters: 18th Century Pyrotechnic Concertos
4/24 & 25/98--Music, Politics, & Intrigue: Marc-Antoine Charpentier's Les Arts Florissants
All programs performed at the NIPPON KAN THEATER in Seattle's International District.




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