Programs Past

3 May 2014
Good Day Sun King: Baroque Music from New Orleans and New France

Baroque music in New Orleans? Founded in 1718 by the French, it was not long before the Lower Mississippi Valley was populated with French people and French culture. And up river in Montreal and Québec, Parisian music publishers provided the northernmost part of New France with music of all types from "back home." Kim Pineda, transverse flute, Elinor Frey, Baroque cello, Hideki Yamaya, Baroque guitar and theorbo, August Denhard, theorbo and Baroque guitar, and special guest Janene Nelsoon perform vocal and instrumental music from New Orleans's Ursuline Manuscript of 1736, plus music by Monteclair, Couperin, Marais, and other composers from the reign of Louis XIV.

8 February 2014
Galant and Grounded: Paying for Time Travel with the Currency of Music
In this concert we travel between the Galant style of the 18th century and the rhapsodic, capricious styles of the 17th century. Kim Pineda, transverse flute, Elinor Frey, Baroque cello, August Denhard, theorbo and Baroque guitar. Music by Fontana, Fiorè, Gabrielli, Kapsberger, Kirnberger, Blavet, and CPE Bach.

4 May 2013
La rhétorique de la musique: Behind the scenes of the grand siècle
Kim Pineda, Joanna Blendulf, August Denhard, and Hideki Yamaya present La musique classique, ou l'époque baroque. Music of 17th- and 18th-century France; what more do you need?

12 January 2013
Breaking Baroque: Diminutions, Divisions, & the end of the Renaissance

Kim Pineda and August Denhard present repertoire from the late 16th and early seventeenth centuries, that nebulous time period where the Renaissance ends and the Baroque begins.

4 May 2012
Battle of the Bands: Le Roi Soleil and Sanssouci take on the Dresden Hofkappelle

At the courts of Louis XIV, Frederick II (The Great), and Frederick Augustus I (The Strong), the cities of Paris, Berlin/Potsdam, and Dresden were regarded as among the finest musical establishments in Europe during the years 1660-1760.

François Couperin, Jacques-Martin Hotteterre (Paris), Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (Berlin), Wilhelm Friedemann Bach (Dresden), and Johann-Joachim Quantz (Dresden, Berlin, Potsdam) and others provide the musical material for us. Enjoy the concert and cast your vote for in the Baroque Battle of the Bands!


Kim Pineda, Baroque flute, Max Fuller, Viola da gamba, August Denhard, Theorbo and Baroque guitar, and Julia Brown, Harpsichord.

21 January 2012
Journey to the Center of the Baroque: Music from the European Heartland
Music by Muffat, Schmelzer, Jarzewbski, and other 17th-century composers from Central and Eastern Europe. 


What composers come to mind when you mention Salzburg and Vienna? If we add Warsaw to the list of cities, are you still thinking of Mozart? Georg Muffat, Johann Heinrich Schmelzer, and Adam Jarzebski were three composers from Central and Northern Europe that were both cosmopolitan and progressive, based on their personal musical experiences. Kim Pineda, Recorder and Baroque flute, Max Fuller, Viola da gamba, August Denhard Lutes, will be your guides on your journey to the center of the Baroque where you will hear elements of vernacular (dare we say "folk") music incorporated into the innovative German sonata, and music infused with traces Lully and Corelli.

24 September 2011
The Baroque Battle of the Bands!

Atrium Building Courtyard
10th Avenue & Olive Street
Eugene, Oregon

Kim Pineda, Baroque Flute
Bernard Gordillo, Harpsichord

Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (1714-1788)
Sonata in G, H. 554
Adagio
Allegro
Vivace

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
Aria [and improvisation], BWV 988

Tim Risher (b. 1957)
River (2009)

Johann Mattheson (1681-1764)
Sonata III in A, from Brauchbare Virtuoso, 1720
Adagio
Allegro
Grave
Giga

Antonio Martin y Coll (fl. 1706-09)
Chacona [and improvisation] from Flores de Música

Michel Blavet (1700-1768)
Sonata VI, Op. 3
Largo
Allegro
Andante affetuoso
Allegro

The cities of Paris, Berlin/Potsdam, and Hamburg were regarded as among the finest musical establishments in Europe in the 18th century. Michel Blavet (Paris), CPE Bach (Berlin/Potsdam and Hamburg), and Johann Mattheson (Hamburg) provide the musical material for us. Enjoy the concert and cast your vote in the Baroque Battle of the Bands!

The program will also include a work written for Mr. Pineda, "River," by American composer Tim Risher, and harpsichord solos with improvisations by J. S. Bach (who spent some time in Berlin/Potsdam) and Antonio Martin y Coll.

13 August 2011
Les goûts-réunis: Music from Paris, Berlin, and Dresden
Charlotte Convention Center, 501 S. College St., Room 213 A,
Charlotte, NC
10:00 AM (early, I know)
Part of the National Flute Association's Annual Convention

Kim Pineda, Baroque flute
Bernard Gordillo, Harpsichord

Frederick the Great (1712-1786)
Sonata V in A
Affettuoso
Allegro
Presto

Louis Couperin (1626-1661)
Chaconne in Bb

Johann-Joachim Quantz (1697-1773)
Sonata IV in D, Op. 1
Grave e sostenuto
Presto
Allegro

Tim Risher (b. 1957)
River (2009)

Antonio Martin y Coll (fl. 1706-09)
Chacona [and improvisation] from Flores de Música

Michel Blavet (1700-1768)
Sonata VI, Op. 3
Largo
Allegro
Andante affetuoso
Allegro

Les goûts-réunis: Music from Paris, Berlin, and Dresden, is a program of sonatas for Baroque flute and harpsichord written by composers connected with the courts in Paris, Berlin, and Dresden. Michel Blavet (Paris), Frederick the Great, (Berlin), and Johann Joachim Quantz (Paris, Berlin, and Dresden) were all significant in the development of the flute repertoire and its rise to prominence as a solo instrument. The cosmopolitan nature of the music by these composers is the unity between the three major music centers in the 18th century. Blavet was known throughout Europe, Frederick had arguably the best musical establishment in Germany and flutes were featured prominently, and Quantz is well-known for his treatise on performance practice and musical travels. The program will also include the world premier of a work written for Mr. Pineda, River, by American composer Tim Risher. Harpsichord solos by Louis Couperin and Antonio Martin y Coll complete the program.

Frederick’s Sonata in A-major is written in the popular format of the mid-to-late 18th century. A slow movement followed by two fast movements of contrasting character. Definitely not the caliber of Bach, the
music still has much to offer and is clearly the work of a well-trained professional musician, with a good harmonic vocabulary, and, ironically, interesting rhythms.

Louis Couperin was a composer, harpsichordist, organist, and viol player, and the most famous member of the Couperin family after his nephew François. Most of his surviving compositions—around 200 pieces—are for the harpsichord and organ, none of which were published during his lifetime. Couperin is considered one of the finest composers of keyboard music from the 17th Century. The Chaconne in Bb is characteristic of his passacaglias and chaconnes (pieces written over a repeating bass line), which are often highly sophisticated, yet quirky and unpredictable, consistently written with a tinge of melancholy.

Quantz’s Sonata in D from Opus 1 is typical of the solo sonata in the late baroque period. The new standard of movements was that of a slow movement followed by two fast movements of contrasting character. According to Quantz, the first movement, Grave e sostenuto, was the absolute slowest tempo of the day, and allows performers great freedom to be expressive. Compare that with the second movement, a Presto in ¾ meter, which Quantz listed as the absolute fastest tempo of the day. The character of this movement is emotionally very different from the first. The last movement is a relaxing, carefree melodic jaunt. Quantz points out that the tempos at the court of Frederick the Great were generally faster than those with the same indications in the rest of Europe, but the tempos in Dresden were faster still.


In 1726 Michel Blavet made his début at the Concert Spirituel, launching a remarkable public career. During the next quarter of a century Blavet appeared at the Concert Spirituel more frequently than any other performer, and throughout the period musicians and writers were unanimous in stating that his singing tone, pure intonation and brilliant technique set the standard in flute playing for all of Europe. Blavet's position in Parisian musical life was unrivaled. Among those who wrote with admiration of him were Telemann, Marpurg, Quantz, and Voltaire. It is likely that many of Leclair's nine flute sonatas and his flute concerto were written for Blavet, for the two often performed together. Blavet's sonatas, among the masterpieces of the early flute repertory, represent the successful transfer to the flute of the goûts réunis of French violin sonata style, developed by Senaillé and Leclair, among others. The sonatas of op. 3 exhibit a modern, galant style, with Italian titles to the movements, and elaborate flourishes in the slow movements.

25 September 2010
The French Concoction: Parisian music with Italian Flavor

Kim Pineda, Bernard Gordillo, and August Denhard present a musical feast of music from 17th- and 18th-century France.

26 March 2009
Lubbock, Texas
Grand Cru Baroque will be performing on Thursday, 26 March 26 2009, 8:00 PM, at the YWCA's Legacy Grand Ballroom, 14th & Ave. O in Lubbock, Texas. The concert is in conjunction with workshops and master classes the ensemble is giving at Texas Tech University.

2 September 2008

Early Music Guild of Seattle, First Tuesdays

Kim Pineda, Transverse flute, and Bernard Gordillo, Harpsichord

Michel Blavet (1700-1768)
Sonata in A, Op. 3, No. 4
Adagio
Allegro, Ma Non Presto
Allegro

Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Fantasies 8 and 9, from 12 Fantasies for solo flute, 1732

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
Concerto in C, BWV 976 (after Vivaldi op. 3 no. 12)
[ ]
Largo
Allegro

Intermission

Jean-Marie Leclair (1697 - 1764)
Sonata II, Quatrième Livre
Dolce: Andante
Allemanda: Allegro ma non tropo
Sarabanda: Adagio
Minuetto: Allegro non tropo

Anonymous
Chacona, from Flores de musica, 1706-1709

Johann Gottlieb Goldberg (1727 - 1756)
Trio Sonata in C major
(Formerly attributed to J.S. Bach as BWV 1037)
Adagio
Alla breve
Largo
Gigue. Presto

Program Notes
Grand Cru is a classification of an entity's potential to produce something superb. It also refers to any item of high quality, or the quality of a region. Our progressive program of pieces by J.S. Bach, Jean-Marie Leclair, Michel Blavet, Georg Philipp Telemann, and the ubiquitous Anonymous all meet the grand cru standard.

In 1726 Michel Blavet made his début at the Concert Spirituel, launching a remarkable public career. During the next quarter of a century Blavet appeared at the Concert Spirituel more frequently than any other performer, and throughout the period musicians and writers were unanimous in stating that his singing tone, pure intonation and brilliant technique set the standard in flute playing for all of Europe. Blavet's position in Parisian musical life was unrivaled. Among those who wrote with admiration of him were Telemann, Marpurg, Quantz, and Voltaire. It is likely that many of Leclair's nine flute sonatas and his flute concerto were written for Blavet, for the two often performed together.

Blavet's sonatas, among the masterpieces of the early flute repertory, represent the successful transfer to the flute of the goûts réunis of French violin sonata style, developed by Senaillé and Leclair, among others. The sonatas of op. 3 exhibit a modern, galant style, in contrast to those of op.2, which reflect the French influence on the Corellian sonata da chiesa model.

When Georg Philipp Telemann published his 12 Fantasies for transverse flute in 1732, he had no idea that Johann-Joachim Quantz would suggest they be used in a flute-playing contest. After Quantz, the well-known pedagogue, composer, and writer about music, had his flute playing techniques publicly challenged by a rival, he suggested that they meet in public at a prescribed time and place, and each be prepared to perform Telemann's Fantasies. They were the perfect vehicle to show what is possible on the transverse flute and for the flute player to display his mastery of the instrument. The day came and went and only Quantz appeared and had the audience to himself. Whatever the 18th century flute player and audience thought, the Fantasies are now seen as a significant contribution to the unaccompanied repertoire of the flute. They are a concise presentation of 18th century music. Telemann presents most dance types in use at the time, as well as rhapsodic movements reminiscent of a keyboard toccata, and by using compound melodies, produce fugue-like pieces where it seems that as many as three individual voices are playing simultaneously.

Jean-Marie Leclair published a second book of violin sonatas in 1728 and made his début with 12 appearances at the Concert Spirituel, where he was vigorously applauded in performances of his own sonatas and concertos. Leclair's achievement as a composer lay in his modification of the Corellian sonata style to accommodate French taste. The result was the goûts réunis prophesied by Couperin, and later recommended by Quantz. He imbued the Italian sonata style with elements drawn from the earlier dances of Jean-Baptiste Lully and from the pièces of the French viol players and harpsichordists. Leclair was often able to combine the two styles and to arrive at a new synthesis.

--kp

Goldberg, J.S. Bach, and Anonymous…

What happens to a work no longer accepted to be by a master? The issue comes up in the art world somewhat often, even making headlines, yet rarely does music ever attract similar attention. Most often, the downgrading happens at an "official" level where a musical work's attribution is removed in a relatively quiet manner (sometimes it coincides with the discovery of the work's original creator). A presumed masterpiece then loses its stature, value, and, most troubling of all, any hope of frequent performance.

Johann Gottlieb Goldberg's Trio Sonata in C major for two violins and basso continuo (formerly known as BWV 1037) is a good example of a work once thought to be by his former teacher Johann Sebastian Bach. Goldberg wrote in a style not unlike his mentor's, hence the confusion, yet today he isn't highly regarded as a composer (he's remembered primarily for the monumental set of variations that Bach composed to which his name is attached). In spite of this, the Trio Sonata in C major has survived its downgrading because of its beauty. The version heard this evening is an arrangement for flute and obbligato harpsichord where the two violin lines are taken by the flute and harpsichordist's right hand, a practice typical of the late Baroque.

What happens when a masterpiece is suped-up by another master? It was not uncommon for Baroque composers to take musical ideas, change, and incorporate them as their own. Sometimes they took them as is and claimed authorship with no change at all. Rarely, if ever, was it considered stealing. More often it was a kind of homage.

The discovery by J. S. Bach of Vivaldi's music is considered important by many scholars. Vivaldi's concertos were not only tuneful, they were attractive and well made. Bach was impressed enough to make some of them his own by arranging them for solo keyboard. The Concerto in C major, BWV 976, was once a piece of chamber music for strings; part of Vivaldi's collection of concertos entitled L'Estro armonico, and, arguably, the late-Baroque's most widely disseminated work. Bach not only reduced its many original parts but also made it suitable for keyboard.

The story of the little Chacona and its variations has neither an illustrious history nor a composer to call its own. In fact, we only know of the copyist, Antonio Martín y Coll, who felt the work attractive enough to include in his large collection of organ pieces called Flores de Musica (compiled 1706-1709). The chacona, like its cousin the sarabande, was a dance that originated in the New World and came to Europe via Spain and Italy.

--bg

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